Thanksgiving in American Cultures

As we know, Thanksgiving is a time where we gather with family and friends to eat, play games, and say what we are thankful for. That’s how most people celebrate Thanksgiving, but did you know that different American cultures celebrate Thanksgiving in unique ways?

For a Cuban Thanksgiving, even though Cubans don’t really celebrate traditional Thanksgiving, they typically have roast pig, also called lechon asado, with white rice and bean yucca. For soft drinks, they have malta with a tasteful flavor and also materva, which is a soft drink that is a little bitter but then sweet.

Next, we will be introducing how Nigerian Americans celebrate Thanksgiving. They really don’t celebrate the holiday of Thanksgiving, but they do eat and have different foods such as red stew, efa (a Nigerian spinach stew), fufu, and goat meat to celebrate gathering with family and friends. 

Next is Haitian American. We do traditionally celebrate Thanksgiving as Haitian Americans. The food that we have is Djon Djon rice which is mushroom rice. We have plantains, fried pork, and Haitian potato salad, which is very different because instead of it being yellow, it’s a reddish purple color and tastes delicious. 

Next is Black culture. Though this includes multiple cultures, Black culture enjoys typically Thanksgiving food plus the addition of some cultural favorites. Normally, some people have turkey while others have ham, depending on your liking. They have collard greens, candied yams, mashed potatoes with gravy, mac and cheese, cornbread, and cranberry sauce. 

Thanksgiving is very different in many American cultures. All of these foods sound delicious, so make sure to try them out one day. Regardless of how you celebrate, have a great Thanksgiving everyone!

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